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Sticks and Stones may break my bones but words can make you FAT

I love synonyms!

Probably not the best way start to an article

I mean who the fuck loves synonyms?!?

What are they? And why do you love them so much?

Well, my friend, you are in for a treat because I’m about to explain…

A synonym is a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language.

However, there is a difference! A pretty big one if I may add!

Using the wrong Synonym at the right or wrong time can have serious consequences.

Let me give you an example

Wife…

“Hey how does my butt look in these Jeans?”

Upon inspecting said rump it kind of looks like it has it’s own zip code.

You now have to choose your Synonym for the word “Big” very carefully here to avoid sleeping on the floor for the third night in a row. You could just tell her a little white lie but it hasn’t worked the last couple of times and your back is getting sore.

Do you go for option A

“Honey your butt looks “Colossal” in those Jeans! Great Job”

Or do you for option B

“Honey your butt looks “Tremendous” in those Jeans! Great Job”

You see Colossal and Tremendous are both Synonyms for the word “big” but only one of them enables you more than three hours kip.

“So how can words make you fat then?”

Once again my consistently impatient friend I will enlighten you…

One incredible thing our brains do very easily is get influenced especially by verbal words and visual pictures.

It’s these verbal words and visual pictures that can trigger emotional responses and actions based on how that person views that word or sound.

It’s these words and sounds that can manipulate what we think

For example

Don’t think about penguins

Don’t think about penguins

Don’t think about penguins

Don’t think about penguins

Too late!

In 1974 a study was conducted by Elizabeth Loftus and John Palmer in which subjects were given two different tests

Test one made participants view films of car accidents at varying speeds then answer questions about the events.

The Same question was said to different participants with a slight change in one of the words…

“About how fast were the cars going when they “smashed” into each other?”
“About how fast were the cars going when they “bumped” into each other?”
“About how fast were the cars going when they “collided” with each other?”
“About how fast were the cars going when they “hit” into each other?”
The word “Smashed” elicited higher estimates of speed than any of the other words even though the cars were at varying speeds.

One week later a retest was conducted and when one of the questions “Did you see any broken glass?” came up the participants that heard the word “Smashed” were more likely to say that there was.

What was strange was there was no broken glass present in any of the films.

You see the words we choose to put in our head for the things we do affect how we do them.

If you were looking to “reduce” body fat levels, I am willing to bet you would have a slower and potentially better strategy of losing it than if you were looking to “shred” body fat.

If you were looking to “Build Muscle” I am willing to bet you would have more strategic thinking behind it than if you called it “Bulking” or “Putting on Mass” Anyone that I have seen use those words with their Operation Get Massive strategies usually ends up looking like a balloon. Much like I did when I said those words many years ago.

So the age-old saying is most certainly true…

Sticks and Stones may Break my Bones, but words can make you FAT!